Wild Iris Sunshine on Purple Flower.jpg
Wild Iris Crag for t-shirt.jpg
Killer Cave from Parking Lot.jpg
Marc Chagnon on Wind Drinker.jpg
Sweetwater Rocks Vista Jesse Brown.jpg
Wild Iris Sunshine on Purple Flower.jpg

Climbing


Climbing around Lander

SCROLL DOWN

Climbing


Climbing around Lander

Lander is famous for its climbing. The well-known rock climbing areas, Wild Iris and Sinks Canyon, are the equivalent of Mecca for climbers all over the world. While sport climbs reign king nearest to town, there are many world class trad climbs and alpine climbs within a short drive and hike. And when you consider the potential of the yet-undeveloped rock, the newer areas that many hard-working climbers have established, and all of the alpine climbs in the Wind River Mountains, you realize that you can climb here for your entire life and never climb it all. For the best guidebooks in town, stop by and pick up the Lander guidebook by Steve Bechtel. Or pick up the latest addition to climbing guidebooks in the area: Bouldering in the Wind River Range by David Lloyd and Ben Sears. If you are looking for personal advice ask one of our employees who will gladly recommend climbing areas, favorite climbs, or classic must-do climbs in the area.

CLIMBING PARTNERS

If you are looking for climbing partners, and have a Facebook account, then check out this new Climbing Partners Facebook Group!

WILD IRIS

WILD IRIS

SWEETWATER ROCKS

SWEETWATER ROCKS

SINKS CANYON

SINKS CANYON

BALDWIN CREEK and SUICIDE POINT

BALDWIN CREEK and SUICIDE POINT

WIND RIVER RANGE

WIND RIVER RANGE

Named for an old cowboy’s two-word description of Wyoming, ‘Wind and Rattlesnakes’ documents the history, people and climbing around Lander, Wyoming.
— Anonymous
Wild Iris Crag for t-shirt.jpg

Wild Iris


Wild Iris

Wild Iris was "discovered" in 1990 by author and historian Holly Skinner, who was in the area mining for gold.

Wild Iris


Wild Iris

Wild Iris was "discovered" in 1990 by author and historian Holly Skinner, who was in the area mining for gold.

She sent word to her brother, Todd Skinner, that she had found rock that looked very similar to Buoux in southeastern France. This was reason enough for him to come see for himself. The rest is history. It was the start of sport climbing in Lander. Elevation, views, amazing fall colors, and great climbing! Wild Iris has it all for the summer climber.

Camping Information

@Atlantic City/ South Pass campgrounds

A few miles west of Limestone Mountain Road, there are a couple of campgrounds managed by the Bureau of Land Management. (BLM 307-332-8400)

@Wild Iris Crag

Free camping along the two track road that parallels the base of the OK Corral wall is very popular during the summer. Please pack out what you pack in. Use the vault toilet located at the beginning of the two track road that accesses the camping. Be aware of any fire bans in effect and honor them. There is no water at this area, so bring plenty with you.

BE DISCREET and low impact! Hang your food! This is bear country. Don't leave food outside of your vehicle unless you are there with the food and consuming. Same applies for dog food. Also do not leave food in your tent during the day or at night. Bears like all food, especially human food! Shoshone National Forest (307) 332-5460.

From Lander, drive beyond Limestone Mtn. Rd (road to Wild Iris Climbing Area) about 5 miles. Look for the brown sign on your right; the turn is on your left. The fee here is $6 per night. Picnic tables, water, and pit toilets. Water is turned off. Price reduced for seniors ($3 with Golden Age Pass).

BJ Tilden working on Moonshine at Wild Iris.

Jeremy Rowan video

Lander Rock Climbs, 2015 Edition Paperback by Steve Bechtel
39.95

Lander, Wyoming is a great place to climb. Whether you are looking for steep sport climbs, long alpine routes, or granite cracks, you'll find it all. Averaging 320 climbable days per year, Lander has earned a reputation as both a winter destination and a place to escape the heat of midsummer. Whether you're seeking out classic 5.7 routes or 5.14 testpieces, this guide will help you find your way to over 1,000 routes on crags of granite, dolomite, and sandstone. This edition of Lander Rock Climbs covers all of the crags in previous editions, with full-color photos and maps. We have also included the newly developed cliffs of Little Popo Agie Canyon, including Wolf Point and the Sweatlodge. Packed with action photos and more detailed maps, the 2015 edition covers Lander climbing like never before.

Quantity:
Add To Cart

Climbing in Wild Iris Wyoming

Killer Cave from Parking Lot.jpg

Sinks Canyon and Fossil Hill


Sinks Canyon and Fossil Hill

Sinks Canyon is the local crag, more so than any other climbing area around. 

Sinks Canyon and Fossil Hill


Sinks Canyon and Fossil Hill

Sinks Canyon is the local crag, more so than any other climbing area around. 

It is close to Lander (9 miles from the center of town); is accessible by one of two short trails from the parking lot below; and it provides challenging climbs for every level of climber. Breathtaking views of the Wyoming plains to the east and the Wind River Mountains to the west are sure to encourage you to the top!

Sinks boasts year round climbing, enjoy sunny winter days and/or early mornings or evenings in the summer. The geography of Sinks provides a variety of climbing on sandstone, limestone & granite cliffs and boulders. The limestone sport climbing on Sinks Canyon “Main Wall” is the most popular area in the canyon. Also check out Fairfield Hill to get away from the crowds of the Main Wall, or to sample some less travelled routes. Another sport crag seldom visited, Fossil Hill, is situated near 9000 feet at the top of the switchbacks on the loop road, and also has excellent routes and scenic views.

Killer Cave from Parking Lot

Killer Cave from Parking Lot

Sinks Canyon Campgrounds 

(4 options all on South/left side of the canyon road as you drive up):

  • 1st campground - Sawmill Campground (State Park) at the entrance of state park and across road from the Sandstone Buttress. 3 camping sites, group shelter and playground. $6 per vehicle resident, $11 per vehicle non-resident.
  • 2nd campground - Popo Agie Campground (State Park) roughly middle of the canyon, close to the Main Wall. $6 per vehicle resident, $11 per vehicle non-resident. 24 sites total (19 pull in and 5 tent), 2 vault toilets, tables, fire pits and potable water. 307-332-6333. Open: May 1st to October 1st.
  • 3rd campground - just past cattle guard on your left and within walking distance to the Main Wall. 9 sites total with 1 vault toilet, tables and fire pits. Open May 1st to October 1st with non potable water. Shoshone Forest Service 307-332-5460. $15 per vehicle.
  • 4th option - FREE camping area just past the Missouri Field Camp. Walking distance to "the Wilds" or Fairfield Hill. Also known as Hugh Ottie. Limited sites, 1 pit toilet and no tables or fire pits. Please keep the area clean. Do not drive off road in wet or dry conditions!

Just a simple one-shot video of Chris Marley on Confessions of a Mask 5.12d at the Moss Cave of Sinks Canyon, Wyoming. www.climbersfestival.org/

Lander Rock Climbs, 2015 Edition Paperback by Steve Bechtel
39.95

Lander, Wyoming is a great place to climb. Whether you are looking for steep sport climbs, long alpine routes, or granite cracks, you'll find it all. Averaging 320 climbable days per year, Lander has earned a reputation as both a winter destination and a place to escape the heat of midsummer. Whether you're seeking out classic 5.7 routes or 5.14 testpieces, this guide will help you find your way to over 1,000 routes on crags of granite, dolomite, and sandstone. This edition of Lander Rock Climbs covers all of the crags in previous editions, with full-color photos and maps. We have also included the newly developed cliffs of Little Popo Agie Canyon, including Wolf Point and the Sweatlodge. Packed with action photos and more detailed maps, the 2015 edition covers Lander climbing like never before.

Quantity:
Add To Cart
Marc Chagnon on Wind Drinker.jpg

Baldwin Creek


Baldwin Creek

Baldwin Creek Wall is just one of the many excellent dolomite cliffs flanking the east side of the Wind River Mountains.

Baldwin Creek


Baldwin Creek

Baldwin Creek Wall is just one of the many excellent dolomite cliffs flanking the east side of the Wind River Mountains.

A less famous cousin to Sinks Canyon and Wild Iris, this Lander area wall is gaining in popularity rapidly. Generally regarded as an “expert” crag, only four of the cliff’s nearly sixty climbs is easier than 5.11. The history of climbing at Baldwin Creek is extraordinarily short, with the first routes being established in late 1992 by Greg Collins and Frank Dusl. The route development hit a peak in the summer of 1994 with over 30 routes being established in two months’ time. The primary activists in this period were Dusl, Bobby Model, Steve Bechtel, and Todd Skinner. The established climbing area is but a fraction of the Baldwin Creek wall, which extends for over three miles across the side of a valley. Understandably, the potential here has not even begun to be tapped.

The climbing season at Baldwin Creek could be year-round, but due to seasonal road closures it is June 1 to November 1. The middle of the summer tends to be very hot due to the southern exposure of the climbs, though early morning and late afternoon are survivable. Fall is the best season here, but that is true for 95% of all climbing areas. Precipitation presents minimal problems, though an occasional thunderstorm is possible in the late summer.

Baldwin is a fairly straightforward sport climbing area; quickdraws and a rope are all you need. Bring plenty of water for hot days and a headlamp for the hard-to-follow-in-the-dark trail. Be aware that the road requires a higher clearance vehicle and is subject to closure later than June 1 and earlier than November 1 if weather requires it.

 
Marc Chagnon - Wind Drinker - Suicide Point

Marc Chagnon - Wind Drinker - Suicide Point

Sweetwater Rocks Vista Jesse Brown.jpg

Sweetwater Rocks


Sweetwater Rocks

Sweetwater Rocks


Sweetwater Rocks

Sweetwater Rocks

If you are road tripping to Lander from anywhere south and east of town there is a good chance you will get a glimpse of these spectacular granite domes. Sweetwater Rocks is home to many traditional routes, bouldering and some fun hiking as well. Most of the rock is situated on BLM land. The best time to explore this area is April-June and September- November. Summer temperatures can be too hot!

Great Stone Face at Sweetwater Rocks

Great Stone Face at Sweetwater Rocks

Sweetwater Rocks Vista Jesse Brown
Sweetwater Rocks Vista Jesse Brown

Wind River Mountains


Climbing and Backpacking in the Wind River Range

Wind River Mountains


Climbing and Backpacking in the Wind River Range

Climbing and Backpacking the Wind Rivers

 

The granite peaks of the Wind River Mountains provide both multi-pitch technical climbing and hike-up ascents. The Cirque of the Towers draws hundreds of climbers a year, though the Winds are full of hundreds of other unheralded, incredible climbs as well. The summit of Gannett Peak, Wyoming's highest point (13,804 ft.) is accessible via a technical trek after a 23-mile backpacking approach. Since the Wind River Mountains are a National Wilderness Area, there are no roads leading in. You must hike to your destination from one of the many trailheads that border the range.

Cirque of the Towers The Cirque of the Towers is the most climbed and most photographed area of the Wind River Mountains. For good reason: the jagged peaks are stunning.

Two of the "Fifty Classic Climbs" as designated by Steck and Roper are jewels of the Cirque: the northeast face of Pingora (IV, 5.9) and the east ridge of Wolf's head (III, 5.6). The other spires here (Overhanging Tower, Shark's Nose, War Bonnet, Mitchell Peak, Monolith Peak, Lizard Head...) offer more incredible routes than can be climbed in one trip.

To get to the Cirque, start at the Big Sandy Entrance in the south. The trail to Big Sandy Lake is approximately 6 miles, with an elevation gain of only 500 ft. From Big Sandy Lake, head up over the aptly named Jackass pass. The total approach is 9 miles. The summer climbing season for the Cirque of the Towers is short, lasting only from about mid-June to Mid-September.

Gannett Peak Gannett Peak, in the Northern Winds, is Wyoming's tallest mountain (13,804 ft). It is a beautiful alpine summit surrounded by jagged granite mountains, glaciers, and high plateaus.

Please note that a Gannett Peak summit attempt should be taken seriously. Glaciers on the mountain are pocked with deep crevasses that in early spring can lay hidden under a coat of shallow snow. Ropes, crampons, ice axes and alpine-climbing savvy are essential.

The most popular trail leading to Gannett Peak is the Glacier Trail, which starts outside of the town of Dubois off of HWY 20-26. From here, the approach is 23 miles over rather strenuous terrain. This is the main trail into the northern Winds, and is very popular in the summer months.

The Ink Wells Trail is the shortest approach to Gannett Peak, approximately 14 miles. However, its usage is governed by the Wind River Indian Reservation. A guide and a permit are required to access the trailhead. If you wish to use this trailhead, you must contact the Wind River Tribal Game and Fish Department at 307-332-7207.

Wind River Shuttle Company is now providing shuttle services for the Wind River Range 

Wind River Shuttle Company is now providing shuttle services for the Wind River Range 

New in 2016, Wind River Shuttle Company can transport you to and from the trailheads of your choice. For more information, call 307-438-9740 or visit them on the web at www.windrivershuttle.com .